God Took Him “Into His Hand”

I like ancient history. Give me interesting facts and numbers and years, and I am happy! Over the years in our homeschooling, we have studied Ancient Egypt (I think Bethany’s favorite,but Emily REALLY didn’t like the mummies), Ancient Greece (the boys’ favorite, I think, because of the heroes), and Ancient Rome. But we began with Old Testament history, because before the days of Ancient Egypt, the patriarchs were already living, breathing stories.

Genesis 5 contains the genealogy from Adam up to Noah and his sons. From one of our fathers to the other, because everyone upon the earth is from the line of Adam and from the line of Noah. Amazing! There are ten generations covered here, eleven if you count Noah’s sons, and they cover a span of 1,656 years, between Creation and the Flood. These men lived an average of 912 years, perhaps because the canopy of water had not yet fallen upon the earth, or perhaps because the effects of sin took awhile to corrupt our bodies?

Recorded here are the births, lives, and deaths of the patriarchs. But there is one exception.

“And Enoch lived sixty-five years, and became the father of Methuselah. Then Enoch walked with God three hundred years after he became the father of Methuselah, and he had other sons and daughters. So all the days of Enoch were three hundred and sixty-five years. And Enoch walked with God; and he was not, for God took him.” ~Genesis 5:21-24

Enoch walked with God, and instead of his death being recorded in this chapter, it tells us that “God took him”. The Hebrew word for took here is laqach, which means “to take in the hand, to fetch, to take from or out of”. It sounds similar to the promise we have as believers in 1 Thessalonians 4:17, for being caught up, harpozō, a Greek word meaning “snatched out of and away from” this earth, when Jesus comes to call us to our heavenly home.   

I want to walk that closely with God!  🙂

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This entry was posted in Genesis, History, July 2011. Bookmark the permalink.

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